IVC Filters Continued to Sell After Manufacturer Aware of Deaths

In the past few weeks, more information has come to the public’s attention as C.R. Bard IVC filters were featured in a two-part NBC Nightly News segment. The year-long investigation raises more serious questions about why medical device manufacturer C.R. Bard continued to sell and market its inferior vena cava (IVC) filters even after the company became aware that its filters were failing and causing death and other serious injuries at significantly high rates. The investigation alone revealed 27 deaths and more than 300 injuries related to the Bard Recovery model IVC filter. The people and injuries featured in this story are real. Their lives were affected in real ways, the same as many others might have been as well. If you are one of those people, please contact our office immediately to see how we might be able to help – (800) 269-3050.

Medical Device to Stop Blood Clots Associated With 27 Fatalities

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Did Manufacturer of Medical Device Linked to 27 Deaths Ignore Safety Concerns?

Latest Actos Trial Verdicts

By Buck Daniel

May 22, 2014 – Two defense verdicts in favor of Takeda have been reached in the past week. On May 15, an Illinois state court jury returned a defense verdict in an Actos bladder cancer death case after four weeks of testimony. Additionally today, a jury in state court in Las Vegas agreed with the company that Actos didn’t cause bladder cancer after a two month trial. These verdicts come on the coattails of a jury returning a large verdict for the plaintiff in the Actos MDL.

Affymax and Takeda Institute a Recall of OMONTYS

Posted by Buck Daniel

February 25, 2013 – On February 23rd, Affymax and Takeda instituted a recall of OMONTYS following serious adverse reactions, including life threatening and fatal events. Omontys is used to treat anemia associated with chronic kidney disease for patients on dialysis. Anemia, in which the body is unable to produce enough red blood cells to deliver oxygen to the body’s organs, is often found in kidney dialysis patients. The condition causes fatigue and sometimes heart attacks.

Omontys was produced as an alternative to Epogen, which has been a staple of kidney-dialysis treatment since 1989. However, despite having knowledge that the safety endpoint of cardiovascular events and death was worse for Omontys than for its alternative Affymax kept Omontys on the market. It was further proven, through two randomized controlled trials published in 2013, that Omontys was no more effective than its alternative despite having far greater risks.

About five patients were reported to have died after receiving Omontys, according to the figures provided by Affymax, and around 17 had severe allergic reactions requiring immediate medical help and, in some cases, hospitalization. The reactions could occur within 30 minutes of the first dose.

Rule Proposed Requiring Electronic Stability Systems on Large Vehicles

By Amber Stanford

May 17, 2012 – This week, a new federal motor vehicle standard has been proposed by US Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for the first time ever. It would require all large vehicles to equip an electronic stability control (ESC) system. Research shows this technology could prevent up to 56 percent of the rollover crashes each year, which are the deadliest, and another 14 percent of loss-of-control crashes.

“The Department of Transportation and NHTSA have long recognized the potential impact of stability control technology in reducing deaths and serious injuries that result from rollover crashes,” Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said. “The proposal is a major step forward to improving the safety of large commercial trucks, motorcoaches, and other large buses.”

Currently, the ESC Systems are available on typical passenger vehicles and have proven to be very successful in preventing rollovers. This success is a large part of why it is already a requirement on cars and light-duty trucks beginning with model year 2012. NHTSA estimates that a standard requiring ESC on the nation’s large trucks and large buses would prevent up to 2,329 crashes, eliminate an estimated 649 to 858 injuries, and prevent between 49 and 60 fatalities a year.